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AT&T invited pentesters to their site with a public bug bounty, but then redirected probes to the FBI's tips website. Dick move.

zdnet.com/article/at-t-redirec

« Redirecting an innocent hacker's authorized scanning to aim at unauthorized FBI targets is the equivalent of Swatting.
Not funny.
AT&T should be investigated. »

twitter.com/k8em0/status/11775

@varx AT&T should have vulnerabilities found, exploited, and their executives blackmailed before turning over all of their personal information to the general public.
Also if you guys need a hand re-routing helpdesk calls to another number, let me know.

@rootwyrm That seems... rather extreme? A public apology and a public root-cause analysis (including social factors) would suffice, to my mind.

@varx it is exactly no less extreme or dangerous than the shit AT&T pulled at the behest or command of those people, so, no. It's not extreme. If anything it doesn't go anywhere near far enough.

@varx Funny thing, today's AT&T is better known as BellSouth. The old AT&T went out of business completely a decade ago, and BellSouth bought the branding.

@BalooUriza @varx no. BellSouth merged with SBC after SBC bought AT&T.
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