Show more

Installing extensions in development mode is still possible and I tried that with . It appears to work perfectly fine, still has all of its data. But users see it under “Not available yet”, they are not allowed to run it.

didn’t bother notifying developers that their add-ons won’t work any more. I didn’t follow the development, so I had to learn about this from a user’s issue report after the new browser went live.

Show thread

So the only mobile browser with add-on support is no more. I’m rather disappointed with if that's still possible.

As of now, for Android offers you a selection of a handful add-ons which you are allowed to install. No technical reason for it, a policy decision.

Ouch, typo in the image – 1.81 * 10^19, not 1.81 * 10^20. Also, it's 2.9 J/s, not 29. The end result is correct, I forgot to correct a mistake for intermediate steps. ☹️

Show thread

This approach is only something for low-power scenarios where you cannot change the battery. And in fact, similar power sources have been used for space probes.

Never mind that the cost calculation is also bogus: nuclear waste will only be free as long as it is useless.

Show thread

That should be barely enough to power a smartphone. So the use cases mentioned in the articles are complete bullshit: even an electric bike would need at least 100 kg in battery. Electric cars? Just forget it…

Show thread

The result isn't exactly surprising: sure, this kind of “battery” has an enormous energy density but you need thousands of years to actually harvest the energy. Even assuming that no energy is converted to heat (rather unlikely), the output of a 1 kg battery will be below 3 watt.

Show thread

There are articles floating around on the company NDB about to produce battery-sized nuclear generators. As with any “revolutionary breakthrough” you might want to take a closer look. I did a rough calculation what kind of output a power source based on C-14 decay can produce.

I can only guess that the algorithm in use produces lots of mistakes. Normally, the mistakes don't matter – it still gets most tweets correctly, so correct languages are deduced. But occasionally it misidentifies enough tweets to cross the threshold. /end

Show thread

But where did it get Indonesian from? While Indonesian uses a Latin script, the language structure is very different from the languages I write. And I rarely use short phrases, so there is always enough text for the algorithm to work on. Beats me… 5/6

Show thread

Dutch is also easy to explain: language recognition algorithms don't understand the text, they merely look for patterns typical for a particular language. A single typo can make English or German look like Dutch, the languages being fairly similar. 4/6

Show thread

The fact that Russian or Norwegian weren't on that list before means: it doesn't matter what I read. This makes sense: just because I saw a foreign-language tweet doesn't mean that I understood it or didn't use machine translation. It's only about the languages I write in. 3/6

Show thread

So right now Twitter shows English, Indonesian, German, Russian for me. English and German are obvious and have always been on this list. The other two languages are new however, in March it was Dutch instead. Russian was apparently added because I tweeted in Russian lately. 2/6

Show thread

I always wonder what kind of algorithm is at work analyzing data, taking great amounts of personal information and deducing all those bogus things about me. For most part, this is very intransparent, but at least with deduced languages it's slightly more obvious. 1/6

Here is one name I definitely didn't expect to see on that list: @davidbaron. David Baron is one of the top experts that Mozilla had. Any browser vendor would be stupid to not hire him immediately.

talentdirectory.mozilla.org/?i

Show thread

One of the remaining requests scanning for vulnerabilities is apparently produced by the DotGit browser extension (thanks @leip4Ier for the hint).This one will query /.git/HEAD for any website visited in order to recognize websites that have repository metadata exposed.

Show thread

Unsurprisingly, all planet.mozilla.org referrers went away – these were image requests only (same with some forums that embedded my images directly). 90% of the Twitter and 70% of GitHub referrers vanished as well however, these weren't actual clicks.

Show thread

But there is far less fluctuation. Apparently, the spike earlier this month was caused by bot activity. Some articles went way down in terms of traffic, particularly as I already suspected the one with "login" in title and an ancient article about Flash.

Show thread

Following a suggestion by @leip4Ier, I created a small Python script to filter the log – only RSS requests and requests by IP addresses that loaded CSS are passed through. Almost all bot activity is filtered away and I am left with around 50% of the visits on most days.

Show thread

I wonder what my blog's stats would look like with all the malicious activity (spam and exploit bots) removed. My suspicion is that these amount to almost half of the visits. Anybody have promising filtering approaches?

And another familiar name on that list: @jmswisher@twitter.com, yet another great technical writer working on , also laid off.

talentdirectory.mozilla.org/?i

Show thread
Show more
Infosec Exchange

A Mastodon instance for info/cyber security-minded people.